Video Game and Media Effects Lab

About

Research conducted utilizes a broad range of methodologies, including surveys, content analyses and experiments to explore the effects of video games on individuals, both positive and negative. Recent projects have examined the role of both game contextual features (e.g. natural mapping controllers) as well as individual difference variables (e.g. moral disengagement, psychopathy, game skill and experience).

  • image of iPhone weather emergency alert

Researchers

Kirstie Farrar, Associate Professor
Kenneth Lachlan, Associate Professor
Rory McGloin, Assistant Professor

Kimberly Embacher, Ph.D. student
Suji Park, Ph.D. student
Adam Rainear, Ph.D. student

Recent Publications and Media Coverage

McGloin, R., Farrar, K.M., & Fishlock, J. (2015). Violent games and violent controllers: Investigating the use of realistic gun controllers on perceptions of realism, immersion and outcome aggression. Journal of Communication.

Covered by UConn Today, March 16, 2015: Realistic Gun Controllers in Video Games Foster Aggressive Thoughts

McGloin, R., Denes, A., & Kamisher, O. (2015). Too Hot to Trust: Examining the Relationship Between Attractiveness, Trustworthiness, and Desire to Date in Online Dating. Presented at the 65th Annual International Communication Association Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 2015.

Covered by NBC Connecticut, May 8, 2015: “Too Hot to Trust”: Study Finds Men Less Likely to Trust Attractive Women

Spence, P. R., Lachlan, K., Lin, X., Sellnow-Richmond, D., Sellnow, T. (2015). The problem with remaining silent: Exemplification effects and public image. Communication Studies. January 20, 2015.

Spence, P. R., Lachlan, K., Edwards, A., Edwards, C. (2015). Being fast matters, but only if I think about it: Information updates in social media. Communication Quarterly. February 15, 2015.

Lachlan, K., McIntyre, J., Spence, P. R. (2015). Responding to a campus emergency: The effect of alert sources on learning, message speed, and perceptions of campus safety. International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters. February 22, 2015.

Lachlan, K., Spence, P. R., Lin, X., Najarian, K., Del Greco, M. (2015). Social media and crisis management: CERC, search strategies, and Twitter content. Computers in Human Behavior. May 14, 2015.

Spence, P. R., Lachlan, K., Lin, X., Del Greco, M. (2015). Variability in Twitter content across the stages of a natural disaster: Implications for crisis communication. Communication Quarterly (2 ed.), 171-186. April (2nd Quarter/Spring) 1, 2015.

Krcmar, M., Farrar, K., Jalette, G., McGloin, R. P. (2014). Appetitive and Defensive Arousal in Violent Video Games: Investigating Attraction and Effects. Media Psychology, 35. 2014.

McGloin, R. P., Farrar, K., Fishlock, J. (2014). Violent games and violent controllers: Investigating the use of realistic gun controllers on perceptions of realism, immersion and outcome aggression. Journal of Communication. October 14, 2014.

Lachlan, K., Spence, P. R., Lin, X., Del Greco, M. (2014). Screaming into the wind: Twitter use during Hurricane Sandy. Communication Studies (5 ed.), 500-518. December 1, 2014.

Lachlan, K., Spence, P. R., Lin, X., Del Greco, M., Najarian, K. (2014). Twitter use during a weather event: Comparing content associated with localized and non-localized hashtags. Communication Studies (5 ed.), 519-534. December 1, 2014.

Lachlan, K., Spence, P. R., Lin, X. (2014). Expression of risk awareness and concern on Twitter: On the utility of using the medium as an indicator of audience needs. Computers in Human Behavior (2 ed.), 554-559. July (3rd Quarter/Summer) 1, 2014.

McGloin, R. P., Nowak, K., Watt, J. (2014). Avatars and Expectations: Influencing Perceptions of Trustworthiness in an Online Consumer Setting. Psychnology (1-2 ed.), 7-28. January (1st Quarter/Winter) 2014.

Farrar, K., Krcmar, M., McGloin, R. P. (2013). The Perception of humanness in video games:  Towards an understanding of the effects of player perceptions of game features. Mass Communication and Society. 2013.

Covered by UConn Today, May 20, 2013: http://today.uconn.edu/2013/05/human-like-opponents-lead-to-more-aggression-in-video-game-players-uconn-study-finds/ and Hartford Courant, May 20, 2013: UConn Study: When Video Game Players See Enemy As Human, They Are More Aggressive

McGloin, R. P., Cope-Farrar, K., Krcmar, M. (2013). Video games, immersion, and cognitive aggression: Does the controller matter? Media Psychology. January (1st Quarter/Winter) 2013.

Farrar, K. (2013). Sex on Television: A Review of Socialization Effects and the Role of Context and Individual Differences. (1st ed., pp. 424-443): Blackwell’s International Companion to Media Studies: Media effects/Media Psychology. January (1st Quarter/Winter) 2013.