Kimberly Embacher Martin

Education

Graduate Certificate in Health Psychology, University of Connecticut, 2019

M.A., University of Connecticut, 2015

B.A., University of Connecticut, 2011

 

About

Kim Embacher Martin is a Health Communication Ph.D. student in the Department of Communication at UConn. Kim’s primary research interests are centered on the intersection of media effects and mental and physical health Her current research projects examine the influence of sexual objectification on young women’s exercise experiences, individual differences in motivations for exercise and exercise flow state, and interactive fitness technology.

 

Courses Taught

  • COMM 1000: The Process of Communication
  • COMM 1100: Principles of Public Speaking
  • COMM 3000Q: Research Methods in Communication
  • COMM 3100: Persuasion

 

Research Interests

  • Effects of self-objectification on body dissatisfaction, body shame, motivation, flow, and exercise experiences.
  • Relationships between immersion, enjoyment, and performance during interactive fitness experiences.
  • Psychographic predictors and usage of mobile fitness technology; relationships between body dissatisfaction and usage of this technology.
  • Gender bias and perceptions of source credibility.

 

Research Affiliations

  • UConn Media Effects Lab
  • UConn Institution for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy
  • Yale University Center for Emotional Intelligence (2012-2013)

 

Publications

Embacher Martin, K., McGloin, R., & Atkin, D. (2018). Body dissatisfaction, neuroticism, and female sex as predictors of calorie-tracking app use amongst college students. Journal of American College Health 66(7), 608-616. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2018.1431905

McGloin, R. & Embacher, K. (2018). “Just like riding a bike”: A model matching approach to predicting the enjoyment of a cycling exergame experience. Media Psychology, 21(3), 486-505. doi: 10.1080/15213269.2017.1311269

Embacher, K., McGloin, R., & Richards, K. (2018). When women give health advice online, do we listen? The effect of source sex on credibility and likelihood to use online health advice. Western Journal of Communication, 82(4) 439-456. doi: 10.1080/10570314.2017.1367028

McGloin, R., Embacher, K., & Atkin, D. (2017). Health and exercise-related predictors of distance-tracking app usage. Health Behavior and Policy Review, 4(4), 306-317. doi: 10.14485/HBPR.4.4.1

McGloin, R., Richards, K., & Embacher, K. (2016). Examining the potential gender gap in online health information seeking behaviors amongst digital natives. Communication Research Reports, 33(4), 370-375. doi: 10.1080/08824096.2016.1224169

Richards, K., McGloin, R., & Embacher, K. (2015). Increasing knowledge of diabetes through source expertise and perceived credibility. International Journal of Communication and Health, 6, 1-10.

 

Conference Proceedings

Fuller, M., Atkin, D., McGloin, R. & Embacher Martin, K. (2019, May) Exploring factors related to exercise, self-monitoring, and motives for exercise app use. To be presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

McGloin, R. & Embacher Martin, K. (2019, May) Comparing children’s experience of flow, enjoyment, and physical exertion in two versions of a cycling exergame. To be presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Washington, D.C.

Embacher Martin, K. & McGloin, R. (2018, November). (Don’t) tell me I’m beautiful: Effects of body-oriented versus achievement-oriented messages on self-objectification, body dissatisfaction, and self-esteem in young women. Presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Salt Lake City, Utah.

McGloin, R., Embacher Martin, K., & Van Heest, J. (2018, May). Don’t go with the flow? Flow state, enjoyment, and physical performance in adolescents for two versions of a cycling exergame. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the UConn Center for mHealth and Social Media, Storrs, CT.

McGloin, R. & Embacher, K. (2017, November). Do video game players make better exergamers? Investigating the relationships between prior video game experience, performance, and enjoyment of a cycling exergame. Presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Dallas, TX.

Embacher, K. & McGloin, R. (2017, May). Body dissatisfaction and neuroticism as determinants of calorie-tracking app use amongst young adults. Presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA.

McGloin, R., Embacher, K., & Atkin, D. (2017, April). Impact of health consciousness and exercise motivations on distance-tracking smartphone app usage amongst digital natives. Presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Communication Association, Boston, MA.

Embacher, K., McGloin, R., & Richards, K. (2016, November). When women give health advice online, do we listen? The effects of source sex and credibility on likelihood to use online health advice. Presented at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Philadelphia, PA.

Richards, K., McGloin, R., & Embacher, K. (2015, May). Increasing knowledge of diabetes through source expertise and perceived credibility. Presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Duncan, L. R., Rivers, S. E., Latimer-Cheung, A. E., Parmar, K. U., Embacher, K. A., & Salovey, P. (2013, March). Examining the impact of future time perspective on the persuasiveness of health messages. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, San Francisco, CA.