Adam Rainear

Education

B.S., Meteorology, Rutgers University, 2014
B.A., Journalism & Media Studies, Rutgers University, 2014
M.A., Communication, University of Connecticut, 2016

About

Adam Rainear is an Ph.D student in the Department of Communication at the University of Connecticut.  Adam’s research interests are focused primarily in the fields of risk and science communication, with a specific focus on communicating the weather and climate to the public.  His current research projects examine using new technology, such as robots and virtual reality, to effectively communicate risky and science-related messages, in addition to other projects which examine social media as a risk communication tool.

Courses Taught

  • Comm 1000: The Process of Communication
  • Comm 1300: Mass Communication Systems
  • Comm 2940: Fundamentals of Digital Production
  • Comm 3300: Effects of Mass Media
  • Comm 3600: New Communication Technologies

Research Interests

  • Science Communication
  • Risk Communication
  • Environmental Communication
  • New Technology and Social Media

Research Affiliations

The Connecticut Institute for Brain and Cognitive Sciences

UConn Media Effects and Video Game Laboratory

UConn Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory

UConn Center for Health Intervention and Prevention (CHIP)

Select Publications

Rainear, A.M. (2019). Disaster Coverage. In Merskin, D.L. (Ed.), The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Mass Media and Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. In Press.

Rainear, A.M. (2019). Weather Forecasting. In Merskin, D.L. (Ed.), The SAGE International Encyclopedia of Mass Media and Society. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. In Press.

Lin, X., Rainear, A.M., Spence, P.R., Lachlan, K.A. (2018). Don’t Sleep on It: An Examination of Storm Naming and Potential Heuristic Effects on Twitter. Weather, Climate, & Society.  DOI: 10.1175/WCAS-D-18-0008.1. In Press.

Rainear, A.M., Lachlan, K.A., & Fishlock, J. (2018).  Exploring Retention and Behavioral Intentions When Using Social Robotics to Communicate a Weather Risk. Computers in Human Behavior. DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2018.08.029.  In Press.

Rainear, A.M., Lachlan, K.A., Oeldorf-Hirsch, A., & DeVoss, C.L. (2018).  Tweeting in the Face of Uncertainty: Examining Content of State Emergency Management During Hurricane Joaquin. Communication Research Reports. 35:4. DOI:10.1080/08824096.2018.1503945. In Press.

Lachlan, K.A., & Rainear, A.M. (2018). Intercultural Crisis Management. In Y.Y. Kim (Ed.), International Encyclopedia of Intercultural Communication. New York: Wiley-Blackwell. DOI: 10.1002/9781118783665.ieicc0053

Rainear, A.M., Lachlan, K.A., & Lin, C.A. (2017).  What’s in a #Name? An Experimental Study Examining Perceived Credibility and Impact of Winter Storm Names. Weather, Climate, & Society9(4), 815-822. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1175/WCAS-D-16-0037.1

Rainear, A. M., Lachlan, K. A., & Spence, P. R. (2017). Twitter weather warnings: Communicating risk in 140 characters—the impact of imperative and declarative message style on weather risk perception and behavioral intentions. Journal of Emergency Management15(5), 285-290. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/jem.2017.0337

Radin, M., Wu., T.Y., Xu, X., Rainear, A.M., & Atkin, D.J. (2017). The Impact of Environmental Attitudes on Environmental Conceptions and Perceived Potency of Recycling Terms. Journal of Communication and Media Research, 9(2), 29-44.

Rainear, A.M., & Christensen, J.L. (2017). Protection Motivation Theory as an Explanatory Framework for Pro-Environmental Behavioral Intentions.  Communication Research Reports, 34:3, 239-248.http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08824096.2017.1286472

Lachlan, K.A., Rainear, A.M., Spence, P.R., Fishlock, J., Vanco, B., & Xu, Z. (2017). Comparing responses to risk messages across traditional and robotic platforms: Source credibility, risk perception, and affective response. In V. Petrova (Ed.), Advances in Engineering Research (Vol. 19). New York: Nova Science.

Lin, X., Xu, Z., Rainear, A.M., Rice, R., Spence, P.R., & Lachlan, K.A. (2017). Research in Crises, Data Collection Suggestions and Practices. In S. Elswick (Ed.), Data Collection: Methods, Ethical Issues, and Future Directions (pp. 49-64).  New York: Nova Science Publishing.

Lachlan, K.A., Spence, P.R., Rainear, A.M., Fishlock, J., Xu, Z., & Vanco, B. (2016). You’re My Only Hope: An Initial Exploration of the Effectiveness of Robotic Platforms in Engendering Learning about Crises and Risks. Computers in Human Behavior, 65, 606-611. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.081

Spence, P.R., Lachlan, K.A., & Rainear, A.M. (2016). Social media and crisis research: Data collection and directions. Computers in Human Behavior, 54, 667–672. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2015.08.045

 

Top Paper Awards

Rainear, A.M. (2018). All the Media are Rich: Exploring the Lacking Human Element in Media Richness Theory.  Paper accepted to the 104th Annual Conference of the National Communication Association. Salt Lake City, UT. [Awarded: Top Papers in Communication and the Future Division]

Rainear, A.M., Lachlan, K.A., & Fishlock, J. (2017). This is “Not” a Drill: Examining Retention and Behavioral Intentions When Using Social Robotics to Communicate a Weather Risk. Paper accepted to the 103rd Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association. Dallas, TX. [Awarded: Top Papers in Communication and the Future Division]

Lachlan, KA., Spence, P. R., Rainear, A.M., Fishlock, J., Xu, Z., & Vanco, B. (2016). Exploring the Effectiveness of Robotic Platforms in Engendering Learning: Implications for the Future of Crisis and Risk Communication. Paper presented at the 102nd Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association. Philadelphia, PA. [Awarded: Top Papers in Communication and the Future Division]

Rainear, A.M., Lachlan, K.A., & Lin, C.A. (2016). What’s in a #Name? An Experimental Study Examining Perceived Credibility and Impact of Winter Storm Names. Paper presented at the 96th Annual Meeting, American Meteorological Society, New Orleans, LA.  [Awarded: 2nd Place At-large, Oral Presentation] Recording

Lin, X., Rainear, A.M., Spence, P.R., Lachlan, K.A. (2018). What’s in a Name? Using Theory to Examine Storm Naming and Response.  Paper accepted to the Central States Communication Association Convention. Milwaukee, WI. [Awarded: Top Papers in Communication Theory Interest Group]

 

Curriculum Vitae